ERAM 557: Meaning patterns Work 1 & Work 2

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Meaning Patterns Work 1: Interpretive Methods at Work

Topic: The two Sense books (see links below) and their associated media employ interpretive methods to map out the dimensions of a multimodal grammar and the role of media, including digital media, in giving shape to our meanings. They use a mixture of the interpretive disciplines of history, philosophy, and social-cultural theory to make an argument about the theoretical notion of “transposition” and its practical applicability. Select a concept addressed in the Sense books (look ahead through the table of contents for the two books) and consider its applicability to an aspect of education and/or digital media of your choosing. Use interpretive methods to explore your chosen topic – in education or any other domain. How do interpretive methods add depth to your understanding of this concept? What does transpositional grammar offer to your exploration of this topic?

If you are worried about choosing a topic, please feel free to run some ideas past us. We mean this to be very open, allowing you to choose something of relevance to your research, or a new area of digital media or education that you would like to explore using interpretive methods.  

Word length: at least 2000 words

Rubric: Use the ‘Knowledge Processes Rubric’ against which others will review your work, and against which you will do your self-review at the completion of your final draft. Below are some of the ways in which interpretive methods map against this rubric:

Media: Include media elements, such as images, diagrams, infographics, tables, embedded videos, (either uploaded into CGScholar, or embedded from other sites), web links, PDFs, datasets, or other digital media. Be sure these are well integrated into your work. Explain or discuss each media item in the text of your work. You should refer to specific points of the video with time codes or the particular aspects of the media object that you want your readers to focus on. Caption each item sourced from the web with a link and be sure to cite all media sources in the references list.

References: Include a References “element” or section with the scholarly articles or books that you have used and referred to in the text, plus any other necessary or relevant references, including websites and media.
You should specifically add an asterisk in front of each new scholarly source that you use, considering using at least 5 new sources.

Related Books:


Meaning Patterns Work 2:
Interpretive Methods in Theory

Topic: Interpretive methods have been outlined in theory in several ways. The two Sense books are specific examples of the use of interpretive methods. There is a literature on an approach named “interpretive” (or interpretative) methods in their own right. This is relatively new and often lightly argued, at least compared to the extensive literatures on quantitative and qualitative methods. However, the disciplines of history, philosophy, and social/cultural theory have long been interpretive. So have meta-analyses, which overview and synthesize an existing literature.

Furthermore, even qualitative and quantitative empirical methods must involve some sort of interpretation when they ask, what is the existing theory or logic model that is being applied to the data? What is its relevance and appropriacy? (Sometimes, this is called “construct validity.”) What are the theoretical implications that emerge from the analysis of the data?

Key questions: What are interpretive methods, in general, or as applied in a mainly interpretive discipline (e.g. history, philosophy, cultural/social theory)? Or, how are interpretive methods operationalized in a meta-analysis? Or how are interpretive methods applied in qualitative or quantitative empirical research?

The focus of Work 2 is meta-theoretical, that is you are being asked to develop an account of the theory of interpretive methods – its purposes, possible deployment and types of analysis that it can produce. If you are a doctoral student, you may (or may not) wish to have your dissertation topic in mind as you write this work.

Word length: at least 2000 words

Rubric: Use the ‘Knowledge Processes Rubric’ against which others will review your work, and against which you will do your self-review at the completion of your final draft. which you will do your self-review at the completion of your final draft. Below are some of the ways in which interpretive methods map against this rubric:

Media: Include media elements, such as images, diagrams, infographics, tables, embedded videos, (either uploaded into CGScholar, or embedded from other sites), web links, PDFs, datasets, or other digital media. Be sure these are well integrated into your work. Explain or discuss each media item in the text of your work. You should refer to specific points of the video with time codes or the particular aspects of the media object that you want your readers to focus on. Caption each item sourced from the web with a link and be sure to cite all media sources in the references list.

References: Include a References “element” or section with the scholarly articles or books that you have used and referred to in the text, plus any other necessary or relevant references, including websites and media.
You should specifically add an asterisk in front of each new scholarly source that you use, considering using at least 5 new sources.

Related Books: